Press Release – 24 October 2016


Calais eviction: Media fact sheet


In this fact sheet, the Refugee Rights Data Project presents data from its recent studies in Calais - providing some accurate facts and figures on the situation on the ground, and peoples' future plans and aspirations. We hope you find it a useful tool when reporting on the camp's eviction.

EVICTION TIMELINE

  • Evictions from the informal camp in Calais are due to begin tomorrow - on Monday 24th October.
  • The authorities plan to provide 60 busses to accommodation centres across France (CAOs) on Monday (capacity for 3,000 people), 45 on Tuesday (capacity for 2,400) and 40 on Wednesday (capacity for 2,000). Meanwhile, a group of 40 people will arrive on Tuesday to begin dismantling the camp by hand.

RESIDENTS' FUTURE PLANS

From early September to early October 2016, RRDP surveyed 429 people living in the Calais camp (approximately 4.2% of the population at the time, according to Help Refugees) about their plans and future aspirations. All findings are available in our full report 'Still Here'. Below are some key statistics:

How long have people been living in the camp?

All Respondents

17.5% have lived in the camp for more than one year

Children Only

20.8% have lived in the camp for more than one year


Where will people go if the camp disappears?

All Respondents

- 32.9% stay in Calais
- 26.3% sleep in the street
- 14.9% go to a different country
- 11.42% go to a different city
- 11.42% go to a different city
- 24.9% don't know what they would do

Children Only

- 30% stay in Calais
- 39.2% sleep in the street
- 14.6% go to a different country
- 6.9% go to a different city
- 2.3% go back to their country of origin
- 23.1% don't know what they will do


Do people want to go to French accommodation centres?

All Respondents

- 60.1% don't want to go to a French accommodation centre
- 22.1% do want to go
- 17.4% don't know

Children Only

- 60% don't want to go to a French accommodation centre
- 17.7% do want to go
- 22.3% don't know


If not, why don't they want to go to the French accommodation centres?

All Respondents

- 46.3% because they think they will be asked to stay in France and don't want to stay there
- 31.5% because they want to continue trying to go to the UK
- 14.8% because they don't know what would happen to them in the centres
- 7.8% because they don't want to be with the French authorities
- 4.3% because they think conditions in the accommodation centres are as bad as the camp

Children Only

- 48.7% because they think they will be asked to stay in France and don't want to stay there
- 41% because they want to continue trying to go to the UK
- 14.1% because they don't know what would happen to them in the centres
- 15.4% because they don't want to be with the French authorities
- 5.13% because they think conditions in the accommodation centres are as bad as the camp


What do the camp's residents think is the best country for them?

All Respondents

- 72.73% think the UK is the best country for them
- 14.9% think France
- 9.1% think Italy

Children Only

- 75.4% think the UK is the best country for them
- 13.1% think Italy
- 8.5% think France


Given that so many of the camp's residents are reluctant to go to the CAOs and hope to keep trying to reach the UK, we expect many to disperse to smaller unofficial camps dotted around the area.

Conditions in the smaller camps

In July 2016, RRDP visited a number of these smaller settlements. These are outlined in detail in our report 'The Unknown Knowns'. Here are a few of our team's observations:

  • The small camps are generally neglected by aid organisations - partly because of their often discreet nature, but also because it's very difficult to identify needs and provide services efficiently in these circumstances.
  • There tends to be much less infrastructure than in the Calais camp, and people are crowded into relatively small spaces.
  • Residents feel less threatened by the police as there is no exposure to tear gas in the smaller camps.
  • The camps tend to be less ethnically mixed than the Calais settlement.
  • Since these camps are less populated, residents may become easier targets for citizen violence and targeted right-wing attacks.

ABOUT REFUGEE RIGHTS DATA PROJECT

The Refugee Rights Data Project is a non-profit project established in late 2015. We aim to fill the data gaps relating to refugees and displaced people in Europe by conducting our own independent field research. Our project is run by professionals with expertise spanning a broad range of sectors. We are independent of any political ideology or religion, and united by our commitment to defend the rights of some of the world’s most vulnerable groups of people.

CONTACT DETAILS

For enquiries, please contact:

Natalie Stanton
Deputy Director and Communications Coordinator
T: 07817 380 897
E: info@refugeerights.org.uk